High Performing Teams

Thrive in Five: Developing “Trust” in Teams

Thrive in Five
One of our focuses of expertise at Evans is on forming and developing High Performing Teams (HPT). A big aspect of high performing teams that makes them stand out from the crowd is the element of trust. There are different things you can do to build trust, such as keep your promises, be honest and ask for feedback, but all of that means nothing without an underlying understanding of safety. We dive deeper into this concept in this Thrive in Five.

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Psychological Safety

Imagine a team you’re on currently or a previous team you’ve been a part of. Think of a time when you didn’t agree with a decision or when you made a mistake. Did you feel comfortable speaking up with your concerns or with admitting your mistake? Why did you feel this way? Chances are you either felt safe doing so or you didn’t.

Safety is an innate need as a human being. Just look at Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. Safety is second only to physiological needs. Often times we think of safety as physical safety. Shelter from weather… free from physical harm… but what does safety mean in a team setting? The key is psychological safety, and without it, you can’t establish trust or have a high performing team.

Amy Edmondson’s graph for reaching the Learning Zone – the ideal zone for high performing teams.

Amy Edmondson, Harvard Professor of Leadership and Management, has been studying psychological safety for decades, and she defines it as “a belief that one will not be punished or humiliated for speaking up with ideas, questions, concerns or mistakes.” She explains that psychological safety can be created with 3 practices:

  1. Frame the work as a learning problem – NOT an execution problem. This creates the rationale for speaking up.
  2. Acknowledge your own fallibility. This creates safety for speaking up.
  3. Model curiosity – ask questions. This creates the necessity for voice.

If you are able to implement all 3 practices, you can truly start to develop trust, and bring your team from the comfort zone, apathy zone, or anxiety zone into the learning zone.

Amy Edmondson has a great 11.5 minute TED Talk about psychological safety. If you’re interested in learning more about her research and findings, you can watch the talk below.

Apply the Five!

The first step to improvement is self-awareness and acknowledgement that there is room to improve. For this Thrive, all we ask is for you to increase your awareness of the psychological safety of your environment. Luckily for all of us, Amy Edmondson also created a psychological safety self-assessment with a total of 11 questions. It’s quick and easy, and the higher the rating, the better your team’s psychological safety! Click below to print!

 

Learn How Evans Thrives!

What better way to inspire you to thrive than to hear about real people making it happen? And what better way to learn about Evans than to make those real people Evans employees and partners?

Meet Chris Shoemaker!

I once held a Project Manager role which required significant communication between my team and the Stakeholders. My manager gave us little direction for how to approach our client counterparts, so our team brainstormed how to properly provide support for them.

Our solution was simple – establish trust early.

As a consultant, you want the Stakeholders to understand they can look to you for support. Therefore, our team developed trust with the client early on in our young project through great performance and personal relationships.

The parental relationship is one where trust is a huge factor. I think our kids, our oldest Oliver shown here, are great proof for the awesome team my wife and I make!

I’ve found this lesson critical for any facet of life. In 2009, my wife and I found out we were expecting our first child. As incredible a feeling as that was, we were scared (and not just because we found out immediately after seeing Paranormal Activity). We had no idea how to raise a child, but we knew we had to trust in the strength of our relationship to be the best parents as possible. Now we are the proud parents of Oliver (8) and Ariel (6)!

I’ve also been a member of various bands (guitar, drums, bass, singing, etc.), and whether we’re writing songs or performing on stage, trust in my band mates has always been crucial for our progression.

As you can see from my experience, success begins with trust in others and in yourself for your professional career, personal life and your hobbies.


Until Next Time…
Evans’ Talent Engagement Team
(Kaitlin Hurley and Nicole Anderson)

Employees thrive when they are involved, mentored, challenged, promoted, paid well, appreciated, valued, on a mission, empowered, and trusted.
(This image was adapted from a commonly shared internet image.)

High-Performing Teams: A Human-Centered Foundation to Healthy Organizations

Human capital, otherwise known as people, is the core, and foundation of any healthy organization. Healthy teams are made up of individuals who each bring their own strengths to combine with the unique abilities and talents of others for maximum productivity, creativity, and innovative power. For leaders, then, building and shaping teams becomes an essential element in ensuring the organization is able to effectively tackle complex challenges, maximize outcomes, and cultivate a culture of commitment – keys to long-term growth and success.

At Evans, our High-Performing Teams (HPT) process is based on a diagnostic, strengths-based approach to provide tailored and holistic solutions that build upon an organization’s existing advantages. Evans helps teams:

  • Clearly define roles and responsibilities to promote leadership and accountability.
  • Create an inclusive social infrastructure and a high degree of information sharing.
  • Consistently rise to the occasion and ensure readiness to change.

The Evans method evaluates performance in terms of team composition and output with consideration for the program’s unique characteristics. The model uses qualitative and quantitative performance indicators to measure team performance, and is based on extensive research and client-delivery experience to ensure alignment among teams, empowerment from within, collaboration/knowledge transfer, and resilience, to allow the team to adapt in response to rapid change while continuing to function at a high level.

Visit our website for more information about Evans’ High-Performing Teams expertise. Interested in receiving a brief analysis of your team’s current state? Click here to complete our HPT quiz.  To access this recent whitepaper click here.

Strong Team Model™ – Evans Incorporated’s Method to Project and Team Success

By Kaitlin Hurley

Developing high performing teams has many facets, one of which is understanding each other’s strengths and leveraging this knowledge to help the team and its members succeed. Using our proprietary method called the Strong Team Model™, Evans Incorporated takes team and leadership development to the next level by helping team members learn about their team, lead strategically to achieve project goals, and grow in their capacity to lead and develop people.

The Strong Team Model™ consists of categorizing strengths into 4 “buckets”, giving a team perspective to the individual strengths discovered using CliftonStrengths. The buckets are:

The four buckets of the Strong Team Model: Wings, Hearts, Boots, and Handshakes

  1. “Wings” refers to competencies and strengths in blue sky ideas and strategic planning, which are necessary to create a vision that a team will own and commit to.
  2. “Handshakes” refers to competencies and strengths in external influence, including outreach and persuasion, which are necessary to obtain organizational resources to support team performance.
  3. “Hearts” refers to competencies and strengths in taking care of the team, which are required to develop and lead a team to high levels of performance.
  4. “Boots” refers to competencies and strengths in traction, referring to execution and implementation, which are required to resolve obstacles and deliver the planned goals.

The Strong Team Model™ is set apart from other strengths-based assessments by the timeline application of strengths during different stages of a project’s lifecycle.

In the development phase a project lifecycle, the majority of team efforts in the beginning should focus around the strategy of the team. This is where the Wings competencies should be leveraged. Handshake and Hearts competencies hold equal weight in the beginning of the implementation phase because gathering resources and team building is imperative for setting the project up for success. Throughout the development phase, the weight on all three of these competencies decrease while Boots competencies increase, because the focus shifts to making sure the plans are developed and ready to be implemented.

In the implementation phase, Boots competencies continue to gain importance as the plans are being executed. Hearts competencies resurge in the beginning of the implementation phase to make sure the team is strong and ready to execute, gradually decreasing in focus throughout implementation. Handshake competencies, on the other hand, resurface gradually throughout the implementation phase, as gaining support and obtaining resources becomes more important as previous resources are used. Lastly, as is to be expected, focus on Wings competencies continue to shift away as the actions become more tactical throughout the implementation phase.

Understanding this lifecycle and the strengths that can be leveraged in different stages is crucial to setting a team up for success while also supporting the project. Evans’ Strong Team Model™ is what helps our clients apply their strengths and build teams, helping team members learn, lead and grow.

If the Strong Team Model™ is an approach you feel would benefit your team, one of our experts on high performing teams would be happy to discuss further! Connect with us for any questions, or if you would like more information at HPT@evansincorporated.com.

Collaboration Fridays: The Escape Room

High Performing Teamsby Fabiana Beltran

If you were stuck in a room with only a handful of clues and a team of your peers – would you be able to escape in under an hour? An indicator of a high-performing team (HPT) is its ability to effectively collaborate. Evans Incorporated (Evans) hosts a monthly “Collaboration Fridays” exercise where staff can come together to team-build and innovate in a fun and engaging way. On September 14, 2018, the Evans team created their own Escape Room. The group was equipped with a background story and a series of riddles that, when solved, pointed to clues that would unlock the door.

“Collaboration Fridays” was designed to provide Evans staff and leadership with hands-on opportunities to test the models they offer to their clients. Collaboration is a pillar of the High-Performing Teams archetype and the foundation for the human-centered solutions Evans delivers.

So, did the Evans team escape the room? Yes, with only minutes to spare, the group worked together to arrive at a winning solution. But how?

Communication and Knowledge Sharing

Once presented with the challenge, the seven-person team splintered off into pairs or singles to solve individual puzzles.

When a pair arrived at a potential solution, they circled back to alert and receive feedback/buy-in from the others. Members actively listened to one another, asked clarifying questions, and offered alternatives when disagreements arose. This allowed the group to incrementally build upon one another’s individual findings.

Dive In, Fail Fast

Resources were limited and were created by piecing together of fragmented information. As a result, trial and error was the name of the game. To arrive at an answer, individual members knew they had to share a theory that could be tested and potentially debunked. They learned to “dive in and fail fast” to brainstorm and effectively problem-solve.

Tracking and Reviewing

When the team identified a clue or new lead, they recorded it. This not only kept the group organized and focused but helped to create a roadmap for the final solution.

Connecting the Dots

The key to unlocking the Escape Room door was the team’s ability to find the pattern that lived within the various clues they found. This could only be done by augmenting one’s finding through the contribution of another. Each building block brought the group closer to the ultimate objective.

Takeaways

Following the exercise, the Evans team highlighted the benefits and potential pitfalls of using such a tool to enhance the client experience. They underscored the advantages for leadership training and found the experience, “…interesting to see how we all worked together.” Though not having a clear end goal was disorienting, the team stated they found it was easy to connect the dots when they communicated effectively. Ultimately, the group learned that success could only be achieved when they worked together. They acknowledged that any future victories could in large part be attributed to the solid foundation of trust and rapport cultivated by the talent at Evans Incorporated.

To learn more about the Evans human-centered approach to High Performing Teams, visit us at EvansIncorporated.com and be sure to fill out our contact form to learn more about our services.

Word UP! Two Evans Coaches reflect on a word

It is Evans’ belief that High Performing Teams require High Performing Leaders and therefore leadership development is a strong component of creating high performing teams. Leadership coaching serves as a valuable tool for enhancing a leader’s capacity to build, empower, and sustain a high performing team. Laura English and Sean Miller are two of Evans Incorporated’s certified leadership coaches. They specialize in coaching leaders at all levels from emerging, newly promoted, and experienced on a wide variety of topics across industries and organizations.

In this series, Laura and Sean are challenging each other to share their thoughts, insights and coaching experiences on topics related to High Performing Leaders using a word association exercise. They believe that new learning connections are generated when the brain is challenged (i.e., responding to a “surprise” word) and they know that there is “power is in the conversation” (i.e., each will give a response to the other’s story). We hope their stories and insights will inspire you to take charge of your leadership growth!

Sean Miller
Laura, your word is Meaning.
Laura English

The word meaning brings up a more visceral response from me. In coaching sessions I am often finding my clients either ‘making meaning’ of something that is blocking them or they are looking for the big M meaning – what is it all about?, what am I doing?, why am I doing it? how can I make a difference? …the gamut of those bigger more existential topics.

Whether it is a big M or a little m, that space of discovery and eventually co-creation of a solution is where a lot of magic comes in from my lens as a coach. That is why I think I got a gut feeling from the word meaning. Of course, I am often brought to one of my favorite books Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl and the premise that as long as we have something to strive for and attach to, the more we will be able to survive, thrive and build resilience.

I am also brought to the concept of FLOW by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi around accessing those moments and circumstances that provide us the sense of being in our ‘sweet spot’ and getting into that space of losing track of time and feeling the sense of appropriate challenge to motivate us to continue.

When clients bring the “I don’t know what I want to do next” topic, it is a great time to reacquaint themselves with their ‘sweet spot’, their Why (great Ted Talk), their motivation, and what makes them feel more alive. That exploration breeds a lot of good stories and ideas to begin the journey of finding the ‘what’s next’ for them either in their current leadership role or in one they wish to attain.

Sean Miller
Laura you are passionately speaking to the fact that people need to feel a sense of purpose. That feeling of “what they do actually matters.” Leaders need to continuously check in with their employees to ensure they still “know their why” and “know their how”- connecting to their work to the positive impact it has on the team/organization.
Laura English
Sean, my word for you is Ownership.
Sean Miller

As mentioned in previous posts, team members are set up for long term success when they are empowered to take individual responsibility for overcoming challenges. Just as high performing teams have high performing leaders, resilient teams are comprised of resilient individuals. Providing your team with the “space” to take action to overcome the challenges will lead to them taking responsibility rather than avoiding it. When a challenge arises, the personal power your team has will prevent them from operating out of fear or pointing fingers. They will “rise up” and continue to take personal responsibility because it’s the only way they know. I’ll offer this question to you leaders: Next time your team is at a standstill, ask them: What part of the situation do you own? And How will you respond to this situation from a position of personal responsibility and not from blame or “passing the buck?”

Laura English
Your response makes me think of the need for leaders to create a culture of accountability. With that cultural norm, an important factor is that leaders need to create the environment for it to be safe to take risks, make mistakes, and learn and grow from them. If leaders do not show signs that it is ok to take risks and ownership, there will be mistrust, ‘passing the buck’ and hidden issues that can risk the ability to be a high performing team.

 

Are you working with building meaning and purpose with your team? Do you desire to create a cultural norm of ownership/accountability? Do you need a look at how your leadership style is impacting your team?

You are welcome to take advantage of a 30-minute coaching session with one of our Evans coaches! Please enter your information below and we will contact you to get you scheduled for your complimentary Coaching Session.

Are you leading a ‘Dream Team’? Take our quick Assessment to find out.

By Nicole Anderson, PMP

Take our quiz to gain insights about where to start as well as some tangible quick wins you can use today to jump-start your team’s performance.

“I’m in a new leadership role and just inherited a team of people. Where do I start?”

“I really want everyone on my team to enjoy their work and to create a culture where people are engaged and working well together.”

“I have been leading a team for some time and we have a big project coming up that requires the team to achieve results quickly. I want to make sure I am doing what I can to support the team’s success in our endeavor so we can really knock this project out of the park.”

“I lead a team of really smart individuals but we just aren’t operating as a whole unit, in sync. Where do I start to help get us on track?”

Do any of these phrases sound familiar? These are just a few of the statements our Evans experts have heard in our work with leaders over the past 25 years, so we’ve created this short quiz to help you answer these questions, and have fun while doing it!  Even better, ask your whole team to take it and spend some time talking about the results together. You’ll be amazed at what insights you will learn.

 

Would you like some help facilitating the discussion?

We would be happy to offer a 30-minute complimentary session to help you think through the best place to start with your team! Please enter your information below and we will contact you to get you scheduled for your complimentary Coaching Session. 

We promise not to drown you in sales pitches. Our human-centered consultants are passionate about building healthy organizations. We do that by partnering with you to design dynamic experiences that build strong teams, leaders, and ultimately, healthy organizations.

5 Ways to “jiu jitsu” Your Next Boring Meeting

By Alex Howarth

“Tell me if any of this sounds familiar to you. You are facilitating or participating in a meeting intended to solicit feedback, recommendations, and/or ideas from a group or team. The purpose of the meeting is clarified, the topic is relevant, and the problem statement is explained; however, when the time comes for the group to engage, instead of a robust discussion you get…crickets. Or maybe you get a robust discussion that includes one or two of your most vocal team members (you know who they are), while the rest of the participants mentally checkout while trying not to make it too obvious that they hold you personally responsible for boring them to tears.

If this scenario sounds familiar to you at all, here are a few tactics you can try that will encourage greater participation and interaction at your next meeting:

Seed the Clouds:  If possible, give your group advanced knowledge of the topics that will be discussed. Not everyone is comfortable jumping into a topic straightaway, so a little lead time will help them develop their thoughts and give you a chance to clarify any questions that might arise before the meeting starts.

Set Expectations and Tone: If you want full participation from your group, then ask for it. Depending on workplace culture, some participants may be coming from an environment where meetings are not interactive affairs. Setting expectations and giving people permission to contribute can help to relive anxiety and lets them know that you value feedback from the team.

Warm Up the Room: Voices, like muscles, perform better when warmed up. No one would expect an athlete to compete without warming up fist, so extend the same courtesy to your participants. Get people talking and interacting up front via a fun activity or discussion topic. This helps participants get comfortable with the interactive nature of the meeting before jumping into some of the weightier topics that could be on the agenda.

Break and Reform: One of my favorite techniques for encouraging conversation and extracting data from groups is to:

  1. Pose a discussion question;
  2. Break the room up into smaller teams to discuss the question; and
  3. Reform and debrief the small team discussions as a full group.

This technique is especially helpful in combating the “crickets/vocal minority” pitfalls that can sometime waylay interactive meetings. The smaller groups reduce social anxiety and encourage participation while maximizing the amount of feedback you can solicit from the team. It will also help you identify important metadata that might not be apparent via a full team discussion (e.g., if the same question, recommendation, or piece of feedback is consistently mentioned across multiple teams, it might be an area that’s ripe for deeper exploration).

Leverage Technology for Fun and Anonymity: For better or for worse, everyone has a phone and they seem to like to bring them to meetings. While having your team on their phones is not a recommended meeting best practice, you can “jiu jitsu” the human impulse to stare at anything resembling a screen in order to encourage meeting participation. A variety of apps (such as Poll Everywhere) allow meeting facilitators to set up quick and easy text message-based polling activities that can be used in a multitude of ways, including soliciting anonymous feedback, priority ranking ideas or solutions, and/or any other creative uses you can think of.

That’s all for now. Thanks for reading and happy facilitating! Connect with us for any questions, or if you would like more information at HPT@evansincorporated.com.

Word UP! Two Evans Coaches reflect on a word

It is Evans’ belief that High Performing Teams require High Performing Leaders and therefore leadership development is a strong component of creating high performing teams. Leadership coaching serves as a valuable tool for enhancing a leader’s capacity to build, empower, and sustain a high performing team. Laura English and Sean Miller are two of Evans Incorporated’s certified leadership coaches. They specialize in coaching leaders at all levels from emerging, newly promoted, and experienced on a wide variety of topics across industries and organizations.

In this series, Laura and Sean are challenging each other to share their thoughts, insights and coaching experiences on topics related to High Performing Leaders using a word association exercise. They believe that new learning connections are generated when the brain is challenged (i.e., responding to a “surprise” word) and they know that there is “power is in the conversation” (i.e., each will give a response to the other’s story). We hope their stories and insights will inspire you to take charge of your leadership growth!

Laura English
Sean, my word for you is Independence.
Sean Miller

This word excites me as it is one of my core values and a big reason why I became a coach. Having autonomy (i.e., the freedom to make decisions as you see fit), creates the feeling of being “in control.” This leads to an empowered mindset where the brain feels “open for business” with no restriction and no worry. You are easily able to create, innovate, plan, and problem solve because there is no fear of failure or someone telling you to “do it their way”.

Coaching is all about helping clients establish a feeling of independence in their lives. In every coaching conversation the client is in control and thus the brain is open to new insights related to the challenges they face and open to generating solutions. I encourage everyone to reflect on the times when they felt most proud or most accomplished, and to think deeply about what THEY DID to achieve success. I guarantee when you look back you will notice that you acted…and succeeded…because you were empowered!

Laura English

Having personally been coached over the years, I always loved that by the time the session was over, I felt so resourceful and had so many other ideas and options than my initial limited thinking when I showed up. By putting the locus of control on the leader through open and creative questions, the part of the leader’s mind that accesses creative problem-solving and solutions. Even further, the sense of empowerment and independence has a ripple effect on other parts of their work and lives.

Sean Miller
Laura, the word I have chosen for you is Collaboration.
Laura English

So interesting that I picked Independence as your word and you picked Collaboration for me. Each are important facets of being a leader and leaders have to balance the need to encourage autonomy with the need for collaborative solutions to be able to operate in fast-paced and diverse working environments.

I recently read about leadership and collaboration in this Forbes article Six Crucial Behaviors of Collaborative Leaders. The one behavior that peaked my interest is the concept of creating “psychological safety” linked back to primitive times when people would either hoard or share depending upon the threats around them. It is the role of a leader to create an environment where team members feel “secure, valued, and trusted” to be able to effectively work in a collaborative, learning and knowledge sharing environment. As leaders grow and learn more about themselves they may find that they have habits or traits that can be limiting their ability to create a truly collaborative culture even though they know it is the right thing to do. By working with a leadership coach, the leader can explore their blind spots and pitfalls (e.g., command and control behaviors, diversity blind spots, siloed prioritization etc.) in a safe way to then begin to identify proactive strategies to release limiting habits. As leaders grow and expand their capacity to create ‘psychologically safe’ teams, the ability to innovate and develop creative solutions are more and more possible.

Sean Miller

You have highlighted the responsibility leaders have for creating an environment that promotes a “growth-mindset.” Leaders need to be self-aware of their “social triggers” that may quickly shift employees from a growth to a “fixed mindset.” When people experience a social trigger, the ability to create and innovate disappears, leaving them focused solely on “surviving” the uncomfortable situation they are experiencing.

 

Are you grappling with the concept of independence in your team environment? Are you finding that collaboration is not as effective as you know it can be? Are you noticing habits that are limiting your ability to be a truly high performing leader?

You are welcome to take advantage of a 30-minute coaching session with one of our Evans coaches! Please enter your information below and we will contact you to get you scheduled for your complimentary Coaching Session.

Thrive in Five: Engaging Team Members

Thrive in Five
Evans Incorporated’s 25 Year Anniversary is approaching, so we’re taking the next few months to reflect on where we are currently and what’s to come! This includes highlighting one of our areas of specialization per month through September. The focus for the month of September is High Performing Teams (HPT).

Last Thrive, we focused on the first step to building a resilient, high performing team: alignment. This Thrive takes it one step further. After you have a team that is aligned in its purpose and is collaborating freely, you have to develop a sense of empowerment in each team member.

Do you want to get inspiring and growth-oriented messages to fuel your learning and be your best self? Click below to get the bi-weekly Thrive in Five messages sent directly to your inbox!

Empowerment

Empowerment is based upon the concept that equipping employees with knowledge, resources, authority, opportunity and motivation, as well as holding them responsible and accountable for the outcomes of their actions, will contribute to their increased competence in their work and overall job satisfaction. As such, developing an empowered team begins with fostering a sense of importance and ability to add value for individual members through distributed leadership, team-imposed governance and accountability and clearly defined roles and responsibilities.

Team Empowerment

Distributed Leadership

Distributed leadership speaks to employees being afforded the authority and opportunity to be involved in decision-making. Specifically, the leadership function is shared by all members and the entire team is accountable for the team performance.

Team-Imposed Governance and Accountability

Governance and accountability ensure there are effective policies, procedures, and processes available and well-documented. Typically, these “rules” are self-imposed and set forth how decisions are made and communicated.

Roles and Responsibilities

Lastly, clearly defined roles and responsibilities ensure transparency regarding the work being performed and delivers balance in the level of authority among individuals.

Apply the Five!

Governance and rules can feel burdensome unless they’re self-imposed. To help your team members feel empowered rather than weighed down, have a discussion with your team to draw out the “unspoken rules” you’ve all established through working norms. Ask your team members collectively, “What are some things you ‘just know’ you should or shouldn’t do based on your experience working with this team?”

You might be surprised at what you uncover! It can range from rules like, “Send a text, not an email, if you have a quick question.” Or it could be as silly as, “Schedule a brainstorming meeting after everyone has had their morning caffeine.”

Jot down the rules as your team identifies them, and have a discussion around what rules make the final cut for your “official team rules” . Keep the rules somewhere where they will be seen periodically by team members, such as posting them at the top of meeting agendas. These rules will also be super helpful for anyone on-boarding onto the team to help them figure out and understand the team operating norms from day 1.

Do you want some help facilitating the discussion? Do you have a question on how to enhance or support your high performing team? We’d love to connect to give you a free 30 minute consultation!

Learn How Evans Thrives!

What better way to inspire you to thrive than to hear about real people making it happen? And what better way to learn about Evans than to make those real people Evans employees and partners?

Meet Nicole Anderson!

Tools. We have, what feels like, a million of them in our house. Well, I should clarify that my husband has a million tools, and now that my oldest son is almost two, he ALSO has a million tools around the house, but that’s another story for another day! The tools are everywhere. I have found them on the top of the stair platforms, by the front door, scattered across the basement and on top of the microwave. Yep! They find a way to pop up everywhere! I can’t say I mind too much. My husband is very good in the ‘fixing stuff around the house’ department.

My oldest son playing around with some of his tools. Like father, like son!

Thinking back to before we were married, I possessed a toolbox with all the basics. It was simple, but it had all the things I needed to hang pictures, patch walls, etc. However, over time, my tools and my husband’s tools were mixed together. I realized recently, when trying to hang some shelves in our new townhouse, I couldn’t find any of the tools needed to do the job.

At Evans lately, we’ve been talking a lot about empowerment as a key element to fostering a high performing team. I realized, in my frustration trying to complete that simple task, I was no longer really empowered to hang those shelves. Sure, my husband would be happy for me to take something off his to-do list, but empowerment isn’t just having someone tell you it’s okay to move forward with something. As leaders, we have to also provide our teams with the right tools to do the job. When we provide our team members with the resources, guidance and information to accomplish the team’s mission, and (this part is important) then get out of their way, we will see amazing things happen.


Until Next Time…
Evans’ Talent Engagement Team
(Kaitlin Hurley and Nicole Anderson)

Employees thrive when they are involved, mentored, challenged, promoted, paid well, appreciated, valued, on a mission, empowered, and trusted.
(This image was adapted from a commonly shared internet image.)

High Performing Teams Tips and Tricks Series #1 – Appreciative Inquiry

Evans High Performing Teams Tips and Tricks Series: Appreciative Inquiry

Are you looking for easy to use tools to help you develop your team? Maybe you are assigned as a new project lead, and you’ve just inherited the team. Where do you start? Or maybe you have new members joining your team. How do you make sure things get started on the right foot? Whatever your motivation, this “Tips and Tricks” video, presented by two of Evans Incorporated’s “High Performing Team” experts, can be added to your toolbox as a leader. This series is designed to put easy to use tools in your hands that you can put in to practice right away to develop your high performing team.

This week’s video offers a creative method to develop your team values. Values are a critical first step when thinking about building a high performing team. Join us for a quick video (5 Minutes!) as we walk through ‘Appreciative Inquiry,’ a tool you can use with your team to help create alignment. Alignment is important because it means there is a strong team roadmap for success, and your team members are choosing to follow it. We are then going to show you how you can apply AI to create a set of shared team values, which is just one of the foundational principles for creating alignment within your team.

Ready for more after watching the video? Take our self-assessment quiz to help you identify where you can maximize outcomes when developing your high performing team. Your quiz results will include more “quick win” tips tailored to your team’s specific needs. Connect with us for any questions, or if you would like more information at HPT@evansincorporated.com.

We would be happy to offer a 30-minute complimentary session to help you think through the best place to start with your team! Please enter your information below and we will contact you to get you scheduled for your complimentary Coaching Session.

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